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Blog posts tagged with 'outdoors'

Be weather wise!
 
If we are lucky, we have warmth in the day, but the nights can still be cold. As our ancestors recognised, it is a month that can easily turn back into winter. If I look at the past few weeks, the day temps have been up in the high teens, but the nights have been down almost to zero on some occasions. If you recognise that this is quite a large margin of difference, then you will realise just how remarkable plants are. Then you have the rain, hail and frosts to contend with too.
 
All this proves that the soil is still not very warm - hence the old custom of putting your bare elbow or perhaps your bare bottom on the soil, to see if it is ready for some of the more delicate plants. Some plants like Cymbidium orchids need a few cold days to help them flower, but a frost is definitely a no-no.
 
I am quite often frustrated by the weather news on the TV or internet as it is massively generalized to cover several hundred square miles - although I must admit they have got better in recent years. Once, in the middle of the last decade, whilst living in Norfolk, the weather girl reported it was going to be a lovely dry night, yet outside my window some 20 miles from her studio, the rain was hammering down. Did I see a hint of embarrassment on the poor girls face? In those days, my obsessive temperament noted they had only got it accurate on 15 days in the entire year. Which is better than a soothsayer I suppose.
 
But of course for you at home, there are ways of telling if the air and soil is warm enough and what the weather may bring for yourself. Buy a weather station. With a glance you can tell if the air has been chilled to uncomfortable levels overnight whilst you were tucked up in bed with Gardeners World. You can also have an inkling of what the weather is threatening to do with a barometer as your guide. If you are like me and become lost in the green world, a clock will help you realise supper was 2 hrs ago and perhaps the kids need feeding at some point.
 

 

In truth the UK has a fantastic array of weather and micro-climates from the abhorrently wet, to the surprisingly dry. Do yourself and your plants a favour and get a bit scientific.
TOWN & COUNTRY WELLIES RATED ALONGSIDE HUNTER AND LE CHAMEAU
Sales of wellies have soared in the last few months and if, like many, you are bewildered by the choice and the price tags on display - ranging from £10 for a basic boot to upwards of £300 for a designer brand, we have some good news for you.  You don’t need to spend a fortune to get a decent quality, good looking pair that will see you through the wet weather. 
 
In a recent tried and tested review undertaken by the Daily Mail, Town & Country’s Premium Wellington – at just £45.99 – were rated on a par with Hunter (£95) and Le Chameau (£340) – with all three scoring an impressive 7/10. 

 

Town & Country’s high quality, British designed boots are hand crafted from natural rubber and designed with style and comfort in mind.  They have a contoured leg and side-fastening buckle to give an extra snug fit, and a soft lining which makes for the ultimate in comfort.  A high grip tread pattern will ensure feet remain firmly on the ground.  They are available in three colours - dark green in sizes 4-11(37-45); navy in sizes 3-12 (36-46) and raspberry in sizes 3-8 (36-42).  The full range of Town & Country footwear can be seen at www.townandco.com
Is your garden secure?


With the recent increase of thefts from gardens across the UK, I thought it would be prudent to write about ways of making sure your tools and even plants are safe from light fingers. Putting a good lock on the shed is a good start. It may surprise you to know, many people still think a simple latch will suffice when it comes to looking after your expensive tools.  However, a policemen friend of mine recently told me, in the majority of cases in a domestic garden, a simple but sturdy brace and lock will put off many burglars.  But you may want to go further and reinforce the doors and roof? Also try to lock any external gates if you have them. Anything that slows a person down will add to your security. Basically, you have to assess what your garden machinery is worth. If you have gone for the top end of the market, with a beautiful Stihl leaf blower etc, you are looking at close to £500 just to replace one item.

Perhaps you have insurance and think it will all be replaced if stolen?

Most insurers now will not consider replacing any items unless it can be proved that the utmost care was put into protecting your tools, then even if you can prove due care was taken, your premium will go up in the following years. A second way of protecting your tools is to mark them. The police will give you, if you ask nicely and flutter your eyelids, a UV marker pen. Write your name and postcode on everything you wish to trace. If you want to go one step further, you can get the items engraved, etched or stamped. Again the police can do this for you. The third way, is to be vigilant. If you see anybody loitering at the rear gate of a garden or looking over fences furtively should be reported. Or indeed, any unwanted visit from people offering their gardening or tree expertise, with no form of ID, should be reported to the police on the 101 number. Equally, anybody offering to tarmac your drive, suggesting pest control or just turning up 'lost' is also to be reported to 101. I am told by a senior police officer, that this will help in future intelligence work. When you do hire someone, make sure your gardener is qualified and insured, with the proper credentials. They may be remarkably cheap, but are they who they say they are? Try to get references and evidence of previous work. Again a policeman has informed me, that some who advertise as 'gardeners' you wouldn't particularly want near your property.