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Blog posts tagged with 'new year'

What a start to the New Year!

I doubt many would want to be out and about in the current weather, but spare a moment to think on your plants. You may think that they will be loving all this rain, but understanding that a plant needs air as well as water, you a chance to stop the rot, before you have to expensive replacements. If you garden is well and truly sodden, now is the time to get out there and address some immediate issues.



The lawn is still growing, given the mild air currents, but it will be sitting wet – something it hates. If your garden is on anything but sand, its roots will be struggling to breath and you will need to slit or aerate the lawn. First sweep away all the debris that has collected. Then, grab a fork. Starting at a corner where you will not have to walk over it twice, insert the fork at a 45 degree angle and lift the turf slightly. It needn’t be by much, just enough to allow an air pocket. Remove the fork and repeat. The best method is to create a zig-zag of forked columns or rows across the lawn. Once you have done this, a light dressing of compost would be welcome. Try not to walk on the lawn for a week or so, to let it settle.

Alternatively, you could just use the special shoes or aerating machinery that is available, but given the amount of water that has fallen, and given snow is approaching, I am not sure this will suffice.

If there are any areas in your garden, where shrubs sit wet, try to fork the roots to give them air. Some trees even – such as the Southern Beech (Nothofagus spp.) – will rot quite quickly if in wet soil leaving you with a dead plant and an expensive headache to replace.

New Year, New Garden

As much as I long for sunny days, winter is a great time to make structural changes in your garden and get some key jobs done. I’ve been repairing the rabbit fencing, putting in the foundations for a new shed and generally getting myself sorted in time for spring. I’ve also put up my new clock. There’s a good range available at Town and Country.



Practical advantages of winter work include the fact that you can transplant even large shrubs this time of year without damage. Any changes won’t mean newly planted flowers drying out before they’ve had chance to establish.

Pen out any design ideas you have for your garden. Large borders with generous soft landscaping cost less than lots of hard landscape. You may wish to introduce new materials or new plants into your garden. Or perhaps you want to go all out this year with a water feature, hot tub or swimming pool!

Many people consider their garden to be a place to relax and socialise, so a comfortable, low-maintenance environment is popular. A patio or timber deck is ideal. You can keep costs down by choosing decking over paving. A more affordable option still is to lay an aggregate material such as gravel or chipped wood for a patio. This is a much easier option for the DIY-er.

Once you’ve chosen a location, ideally somewhere sunny and not too overlooked by neighbours, clear the sites completely of weeds and debris. Remove as many of the weeds as possible, then lay a layer of good-quality geotextile membrane, overlapping any edges by 500mm. You’ll need a raised edge to retain the aggregate, but simple timber boards supported by stakes should do the trick. Lastly, spread your chosen material evenly with a rake to a depth of 50mm. After a couple of weeks it will have compacted so top it up as necessary.

-- Rob Amey