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Blog posts tagged with 'gloves'

Town & Country displays Captivating Colours and new products at Glee 2017

 

captivating_colours

 

For over 30 years, Town & Country has focused on bringing innovation to the gardening sector, with a range of gloves and footwear that combines quality, functionality and style, with a price tag that represents exceptional value for money. At this year’s GLEE, the company will display a range of new products from its ‘Captivating Colours’ collection.

With the new addition of purple, teal and pink, the collection will brighten up even the dullest of days in the garden. One of the ranges to get the ‘Captivating Colours’ treatment is the Bamboo Glove. This is the choice for the environmentally conscious gardener. The natural bamboo fibres are luxuriously soft, naturally hypoallergenic and antibacterial. The latex coating on the palms and fingers offers full dexterity and grip, whilst protecting from thorns and brambles.

Also part of the ‘Captivating Colours’ collection is the Ultimax Glove, a multi-feature glove designed to offer an extremely close fit, unequalled dexterity and exceptional durability. Ultimax gloves carry out heavy duty tasks in maximum comfort. The palm is made from strong but flexible synthetic leather and features textured palm pads for improved grip, added protection and extra durability. The back of the glove is stretch elastane for optimum comfort and fit with a neoprene knuckle ‘shock absorber’ and reinforced fingertips. At just £15.99, these are the perfect example of Town & Country’s ethos of providing quality products at an affordable price.

Also on the stand will be Town & Country’s ever-popular Cloggies.  These lightweight, comfortable, slip-on shoes are perfect for leaving by the backdoor, ready to slip on and off when needed. No more racing to get your shoes on when it starts to rain and you need to get the washing in! Available in the three signature colours, as well as a patterned design, Cloggies are contoured to fit the foot comfortably.

For those looking for a Wellington boot, Town & Country will have a number of designs on display. The Bradgate is a short fit natural rubber boot with a cushioned insole and lining for comfort. A steel shank provides added support, and the contoured design and reinforced seams add to the strength of the boot. It provides added flexibility and manoeuvrability thanks to its shorter fit, and is available in a variety of calf fittings. The classic boot is now available in two new patterns in aubergine & cream and navy & pink.

Another boot now available in these eye-catching patterns is the Bosworth. This is a traditional length boot with a cushioned insole and lined for comfort. Made from natural rubber, with an adjustable strap for a secure fit. They have a contoured design and reinforced seams for strength, with a steel shank again providing added support.

It is not just gloves and boots that have had the ‘Captivating Colour’ makeover. Also available from the collection is a pair of secateurs in the three colours, as well as kneepads and kneelers in teal. The secateurs have a cushioned handle and built in safety catch that makes them extremely easy to use and perfect for light duty pruning.  The chrome plated carbon steel blades and comfort grip handle provide ease of use, with the tool able to cut branches and stems up to 2cm thick. 

Prices

Bamboo Gloves - £5.99

Ultimax Gloves - £15.99

Cloggies - £12.99

Bradgate - £36.99

Bosworth - £49.99

Kneepads – £7.99

Kneeler – £29.99

Secateurs – £9.99

As of August 2017, Town & Country is a division of E P Barrus; a British Company with over 100 years trading experience.

For more information, and to see the products, please visit stand 18M10-N11.

To view the entire range, please visit www.townandco.com

 

 

The most magical time of the year!

 

Here’s a tip for all you hardy gardeners still out and about.

If you have some beautiful leather gloves that have got wet whilst being used in the call of duty, do not fret!

Firstly, do not put them on the radiator! Allow them to dry naturally away from any heat (any direct heat will make the leather go hard). A scrunch up before putting them on and voila – perfect leather gloves.

Yes, it's that time of year again. I don’t know about you, but I always struggle every year to find the ideal gift for the avid gardener. They usually have their favourite tools and new ones are always met with a smile and the ever so telling ‘place reverently down’ whilst moving on to something they really wanted.

Well, let me give you some ideas and you can shout at me instead.

When I worked at Singapore Botanic Gardens, we only used serrated bypass snips for all our flower work. They are extremely versatile and excellent at dead heading - but very little used in the UK. So unless he or she has worked at a tropical Botanic Garden, I doubt they are in the tool kit. Explain to your gardening friend that they are what the professionals use to keep the flowers budding without leaving the tell-tale rip and all will be well.

I am also going to recommend you buy some of the excellent ‘bamboo’ gloves from this site. Environmentally friendly, comfortable and durable. I love ‘em. However, the recipient might be underwhelmed if it is the ‘main’ present. How about offering them as a teaser in the stocking?

In fact if you buy a pair of Town and Country Boot socks, that’s your stockings sorted for the year too! As an added bonus, they are very warm - so much so, my wife wears mine - so I am going to have to invest in some more!

Finally, if your gardener is more of a reader, might I suggest you buy them a good old fashioned book. One of my favourites of all time is ‘The Plant Hunters’ By M Tyler-Whittle. An excellent book which explores how we got the beautiful plants we all admire today. Another book I will recommend is ‘Flora Britannica’ by Richard Mabey. A really, really beautiful book full of wonderful knowledge by the man who brought us ‘Food for free’ – another very interesting book!

Have a great Christmas!

Winter Gardening

I am looking forward to winter in the garden.

The truth be told, last winter was so mild, I psychologically missed the hard frosts and snow. I know that sounds odd, but they have a very useful role in the garden. If you dig over your vegetable areas now - leaving the soil in large lumps - not only will mother nature help break the soil up properly, but the pests like slugs, wire worms and soil living aphids will be killed.

Last winter was so mild for many of us that all these pests continued to multiply causing headaches for us all spring and summer.

I am also looking forward to winter, because I am confident my feet and hands will be warm. The T & C premium suede gloves have never let my fingers down, (when combined with latex gloves for really cold days) and to top it off, I have purchased the Town and Country ‘Charnwood Boots’. Combined with a pair of boot socks, I will be warm and dry for the foreseeable future!

                                            

In the garden things are just slowing down so now is the time to start cutting back the perennials that need it – remember, some need the foliage for protection so look at your guidance notes. In the cool greenhouse,  you can also look at planting some sweet peas in pots for a good display next year. There are some lovely old varieties. On the veg plot, now is the time to sow broad beans and if you are so inclined, winter hardy peas. I am told that those that over-winter have less black-fly, but I have never truly found that to be the case. Either way, the plants get a head start and if the winter is another mild one, you will have a crop of broad beans in April as I did this year. You can always keep sowing from Spring all the way to June to get a succession of crops until September!

If you like tulips, now is also the time to plant them. Last year I must admit was a disaster as many bulbs rotted off or were eaten by the marauding slugs as they pushed up through the spring soil. If this is a recurring problem for you, I suggest you try a different area where the soil is not so wet. Tulips are beautiful, but not necessarily as hardy as narcissi.

Finally, add manure or other mulch to your borders. You will help the plants survive the worst of the weather by supplying the roots with a nice covering. Never apply mulch in Spring as you will keep the cold trapped in the ground for longer.

Blackthorn Winter
 
Well, we are at the end of the blackthorn winter. If you are not sure what the blackthorn winter is, I shall endeavour to educate. In old country lore, there is a plant called the blackthorn, or if you prefer scientifically it is the Prunus spinosa. Anyway, it is said, when in flower, there is always a second winter. If you are unsure of what you are looking for, it is the bush with the horrendous thorns, the beautiful white cherry-like blossom and the incredibly tart fruit known as a sloe.  So now you know.

 

I must say, before the cold weather set in, I was enjoying the display of Magnolia flower. Many of you may be interested to know it is the very first example of an insect attracting flower, so thus it is the oldest flower design discovered in the fossil record.

 

In the garden, you may just about get away with still planting bare-rooted shrubs such as roses and raspberries, provided you give them a copious amount of food and a healthy watering.

 

Now is the time to prune some of the winter flowering plants such as Jasminum nudiflorum, Viburnum x bodnantense, Viburnum farreri and Viburnum Fragrans which should be at the end of their flowering. This early clip will allow them to grow new shoots for next year’s display, without the plant growing beyond the size you want.  This is quite an important tip for all those gardeners who want to know proper husbandry. Don’t just prune in summer or autumn randomly – try to prune the right plant at the right time, to improve the life of the plant and to improve flowering.

 

Another key plant that is in flower now is the Camellia.  All that flowering is going to leave it a little short on food, so now is the time to give it a good boost with azalea food. This will not only help it for this year, but also next. Remember, prune a Camellia just after it has flowered to give it a chance to grow next year’s buds.
Winter Warmers
 

The internet is awash with predictions about what this winter is going to be like. Across the Atlantic, the US has already had its first major snow storm and is expecting more to come.

Traditionally of course, the gardener’s old lore states that in years where there is an abundance of acorns and apples, a hard winter is sure to follow. But I have to admit, not having seen any statistics to back this up, this is perhaps dubious.

The climatologists are predicting, whatever happens, be it snow or rain, it will not be slight. In some quarters it is a stark appraisal - the declaration being that the precipitation won`t be for a few days, but stretch out to a number of weeks, perhaps months. So if we get snow, it will stay. However, I have to say here again, in the South East, there is yet again a serious lack of rain, which will lead to problems next year if the weather does not change.
The meteorologists are less specific. Their long range forecasts state that November will be cold, but mild in comparison to previous years, but of course, they readily admit that they can`t accurately say beyond 5 days what the weather offers.

Either way, it is best to get the right clothes early. Personally, I can`t recommend highly enough Town and Country`s new Rutland neoprene wellies, which are well priced in the market and a bargain considering the manufacturing processes involved. They are warm, hard wearing and comfortable - which, coming from a man who suffers plantar fasciitis this is important. Gloves too play an important part for the brave winter gardener. Last year we had a hoar frost which was so cold I had to wear 3 pairs of gloves at once - a neoprene base layer, the Town and Country Bamboo Textured gloves as secondary layer then the Town and Country Premium Leather and Suede Gloves for warmth.

Trust me, if you buy before the cold really starts, you will not regret the decision.

- Guy Deakins