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Blog posts tagged with '2014'

TOWN & COUNTRY WELLIES RATED ALONGSIDE HUNTER AND LE CHAMEAU
Sales of wellies have soared in the last few months and if, like many, you are bewildered by the choice and the price tags on display - ranging from £10 for a basic boot to upwards of £300 for a designer brand, we have some good news for you.  You don’t need to spend a fortune to get a decent quality, good looking pair that will see you through the wet weather. 
 
In a recent tried and tested review undertaken by the Daily Mail, Town & Country’s Premium Wellington – at just £45.99 – were rated on a par with Hunter (£95) and Le Chameau (£340) – with all three scoring an impressive 7/10. 

 

Town & Country’s high quality, British designed boots are hand crafted from natural rubber and designed with style and comfort in mind.  They have a contoured leg and side-fastening buckle to give an extra snug fit, and a soft lining which makes for the ultimate in comfort.  A high grip tread pattern will ensure feet remain firmly on the ground.  They are available in three colours - dark green in sizes 4-11(37-45); navy in sizes 3-12 (36-46) and raspberry in sizes 3-8 (36-42).  The full range of Town & Country footwear can be seen at www.townandco.com
What a start to the New Year!

I doubt many would want to be out and about in the current weather, but spare a moment to think on your plants. You may think that they will be loving all this rain, but understanding that a plant needs air as well as water, you a chance to stop the rot, before you have to expensive replacements. If you garden is well and truly sodden, now is the time to get out there and address some immediate issues.



The lawn is still growing, given the mild air currents, but it will be sitting wet – something it hates. If your garden is on anything but sand, its roots will be struggling to breath and you will need to slit or aerate the lawn. First sweep away all the debris that has collected. Then, grab a fork. Starting at a corner where you will not have to walk over it twice, insert the fork at a 45 degree angle and lift the turf slightly. It needn’t be by much, just enough to allow an air pocket. Remove the fork and repeat. The best method is to create a zig-zag of forked columns or rows across the lawn. Once you have done this, a light dressing of compost would be welcome. Try not to walk on the lawn for a week or so, to let it settle.

Alternatively, you could just use the special shoes or aerating machinery that is available, but given the amount of water that has fallen, and given snow is approaching, I am not sure this will suffice.

If there are any areas in your garden, where shrubs sit wet, try to fork the roots to give them air. Some trees even – such as the Southern Beech (Nothofagus spp.) – will rot quite quickly if in wet soil leaving you with a dead plant and an expensive headache to replace.